British PM Theresa May has formally notified the EU that the UK is out and done.  Like everyone else on Earth, I don’t know what to expect for the future of the British people.  Just as we in America have done with electing a government outsider with no experience in civil or military service, they’re taking an enormous chance.

There is clearly a worldwide movement against Globalization and toward self-determination at work.  It’s just getting started too.  I am supportive of this movement, both at home and abroad, because I have long been of the opinion that people should have as much control over their own lives as much as possible.

You can’t separate Brexit from Trump’s election and similar independence movements elsewhere.  Yes, there is an anti-immigrant underbelly to it all.  I maintain that this is driven by a sense that excessive immigration mostly serves the interests of powerful global and corporate interests, not those of the localities that absorb the immigrants.  Even though many of us believe that immigration is a net positive for society, we are also leery about the wisdom of bringing in millions of people from the Third World who do not speak our own languages, don’t possess valuable job skills, and may not be willing to accommodate themselves to our culture or customs or laws.

It’s less about hatred of “the other” and more about people demanding that their own governments serve them, not outside interests that don’t seem to care about their own interests at all.

I suppose the question for this age is whether or not the global economy, with its inter-dependencies and massive migrations of people, is too complex for the people to determine and that they need skilled and knowledgeable (yet unaccountable) elites to make those decisions for them.  We can’t yet say, but we are definitely going to find out in the coming years.

It’s my opinion that this is all for the best.

 

7 comments

  1. It’s less about hatred of “the other” and more about people demanding that their own governments serve them, not outside interests that don’t seem to care about their own interests at all.

    This. Well said.

  2. For years the Brits (and everyone else in Europe) has had to deal with unelected commissioners passing politically correct policies that had little to deal with real life. Kudos to England; here’s hoping we have a new and stronger partnership with each other.

  3. I would imagine that having Trump as the US President is the best possible thing for the UK. He’s a major Anglophile. Strange that they seem to hate him so much when he’s clearly willing to give them more favorable trade arrangements than Obama would have.

  4. A couple of random thoughts:
    1. The idea that EU laws are created by un-elected officials is kinda funny, given that the biggest Bexiteer, Nigel Farage, is literally, an Elected Member of the European Parliament and has been since 1999.
    2. The demographics on this are much like the Trump election – old people voted for it, young people against it. The old fucking over the young, with long lasting consequences, fueled by racial and anti-immigrant sentiment. The same people who tanked the economy, ran up sky-high deficits are now looking for someone to blame it on.
    3. Our governments serve large donors, primarily. Corporations and the wealthy are pitting the rural poor v. the urban minorities, scaring the middle class with encroachment from the lower class, all while funding wars and their own tax cuts. (The reason Trumpcare tanked is because the one thing they were not willing to compromise on was the tax cuts for the wealthy. So they are moving on to…tax cuts.)

  5. Merkal , that East German commie, was on the verge of doing something that Hitler, Hindenburg, Stalin, Napoleon , Adolphus, and a few other could never do…. unite All of the European massesunder one flag of control…

  6. For years the Brits (and everyone else in Europe) has had to deal with unelected commissioners passing politically correct policies that had little to deal with real life.

    1. Unelected. Sounds awful – but doesn’t really tell the whole story. Yes the members of the European Commission are unelected – but they are appointed by the (elected) Government of each country. And are confirmed by the (elected) European Parliament. It’s sort of like the States complaining that Trumps cabinet is unelected.
    2. Passing policies. Actually no, they aren’t able to pass any laws. It can only propose laws. And only in areas where the (elected) Governments have allowed it to do so. For a proposal to become law it has to go through the Council (which is all the heads of Governments) and also the European Parliament (who are directly elected)
    3. Policies that have little to do with real life – such as? Bear in mind much of the ‘crazy EU laws’ referred to in Daily Mail headlines over the years are either wholly made up bullshit, or massively misleading. Also bear in mind that the UK have voted against only about 2% of the laws passed.

    I get the impulse. And I don’t necessarily disagree with it. But the thing is – as I kept on banging on about ad nauseum during the election – always look at what you’re voting for – not just what you’re voting against. The UK have just given up a huge amount of influence internationally. We’ve walked away from a seat at the table, where we held considerable power to influence policy and regulations across Europe. Even if you could argue that the British people have more autonomy now – those decisions have much less influence.

    It’s like locking yourself in a cupboard at a party. Yeah, you wouldn’t have to share any of your beers, and you wouldn’t have to talk to Jeff from your office if you didn’t want to. But you don’t get any say over what music gets played, get to share in any of the pizza, and the hot Italian is dancing in the kitchen with the French guy and the German. Maybe you can persuade her to come dance in your cupboard?

    Maybe we can negotiate better deals upon Brexit, and we end up in a better position. That somehow being outside of the EU will make some sort of difference to the negotiating power of our Government. Fingers crossed. But it’s one hell of a gamble. And for what? Were we really getting such a bad deal before?

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